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State of Massachusetts

Judicial Selection in the States: Massachusetts

Overview

News

I mentioned in the last post on Arkansas Issue 1 that most states elect the clerks of their general jurisdiction courts. In all, a total...

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On the ballot this November in Arkansas is Issue 1, a constitutional amendment that would make several changes to the terms, election, and eligibility of...

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The Oklahoma Senate yesterday approved its version of HB 3162, a constitutional amendment that would restructure the way appellate judges are chosen in the state...

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Courtesy of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of...

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The Massachusetts judiciary is composed of the supreme judicial court, the appeals court, and the trial court. Seven departments make up the trial court: the superior court, the district court, the Boston Municipal Court, the juvenile court, the housing court, the land court, and the probate and family court. Since 1780, Massachusetts judges have been appointed for life by the governor with the consent of the governor's council. Since 1975, Massachusetts governors have created nominating commissions by executive order to advise them in making judicial appointments.