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State of District of Columbia

Judicial Selection in the States: District of Columbia

Overview

News

A plan to restructure North Carolina s entire judicial election map was approved in committee earlier this week but appears to have been blocked from...

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News reports indicate that at least two members of the New Jersey Senate plan to introduced a constitutional amendment to require New Jersey supreme court...

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When Texas chief justice in his State of the Judiciary address brought up the issue of ending straight ticket voting (STV) for judicial races I...

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A set of tables that provide detailed information about selection...

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Until Congress passed the District of Columbia Court Reform and Criminal Procedure Act of 1970, the federal courts in D.C. exercised both federal and local jurisdiction. The 1970 legislation established the court of appeals and the superior court to assume responsibility for local jurisdiction. Judges of these courts are appointed to fifteen-year terms by the president with senate confirmation. The president appoints judges from lists submitted by the judicial nomination commission. Judges who seek reappointment to office upon the completion of their terms are evaluated by the judicial disabilities and tenure commission. Judges who are rated "well qualified" by the commission are automatically reappointed. Judges found to be "qualified" may be appointed by the president for an additional term, subject to senate confirmation. If the president chooses not to reappoint a "qualified" judge, or if the commission finds a judge "unqualified," the judicial nomination commission compiles a new list of candidates.