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State of Arizona

Judicial Selection in the States: Arizona

Overview

News

Georgia has one of the most complex trial court systems in the nation, with at least 6 distinct trial courts (Superior, Probate, State, Magistrate, Municipal,...

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A hearing was held earlier this week on a series of bills filed to address diversity in the Rhode Island judiciary. Video of the hearing...

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The ongoing efforts by members of the Rhode Island House to diversify the bench continues. HB 7908 as filed would require the state s Judicial...

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Examines successful judicial selection reform efforts in six states, discussing...

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The Arizona judiciary is composed of three courts of general jurisdiction--the supreme court, the court of appeals, and the superior court. Appellate judges and superior court judges in Maricopa and Pima Counties are chosen through merit selection. After an initial two-year term, judges must stand for retention. Superior court judges in smaller counties are chosen in nonpartisan elections.

In 1992, Arizona voters approved Proposition 109, which called for the adoption of a process for evaluating judicial performance. Arizona is the only state with a constitutionally mandated judicial performance evaluation program. Judicial performance review in Arizona is intended to provide the public with information about judges who are standing for retention and to encourage judicial self-evaluation and improvement. For more information about Arizona's judicial performance evaluation program, see Judicial Selection Reform: Examples from Six States.